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Dinosaur Bar-B-Que's Red Rub

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que's Red Rub


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Red Rub

This rub recipe is the perfect starting point for a spicy plate of wings, and is a key component to Dinosaur's chicken wings.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 Cup smoked paprila
  • 1/4 Cup Kosher salt
  • 1/4 Cup raw sugar, preferably Sugar in the Raw
  • 2 Tablespoons dark chili powder
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated garlic
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated onion
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 Teaspoon cumin
  • 1 Teaspoon celery salt
  • 1/4 Teaspoon cayenne

4plates2table

This recipe is adapted from the Dinosaur Bar-B-Que All American Roadhouse Cookbook . I love their restaurant in Rochester, New York. Lucky for me, I have family that lives there! I can always count on a dinner at Dinosaur when we visit. This is a great BBQ rub to put on anything you want to grill. I love it on boneless chicken breasts. Grill the chicken with the rub and then halfway through, slather with your favorite BBQ sauce.

  • 1/2 cup paprika
  • 1/2 cup kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup garlic powder
  • 6 tbsp onion powder
  • 1/4 cup chili powder
  • 1 tbsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper

I place all the ingredients in a good size (32oz) air-tight plastic container. To make sure the brown sugar is properly incorporated, use your hands to mix it together… put the lid on and give it a shake. That’s it! Use what you need, then store it in your pantry. Although Dinosaur doesn’t indicate a shelf-life, I’ve kept mine for more than a month and it’s perfect.


Smoky Red Rub

This rub from John Stage, founder of the famous Dinosaur Bar-B-Que in Syracuse, New York, combines paprika, cayenne, and sugar for a caramelized, spicy-sweet coating.

  • 2 Tbsp smoked paprika
  • 2 Tbsp Kosher salt
  • 2 Tbsp sugar in the raw
  • 1 Tbsp chili powder
  • 2 ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 ½ tsp granulated garlic
  • 1 ½ tsp granulated onion
  • ⅛ tsp cumin
  • ½ tsp celery salt
  • ⅛ tsp cayenne pepper

Cajun fried catfish

Crispy cornmeal crusted, cajun spiced w/ black-eyed pea relish & tartar sauce

Jerk Salmon

Jerk marinaded & glazed w/ spicy cucumber salad, sesame seeds, chives

West Texas rib-eye

Certified Angus Beef ® Steak, center cut, 30 day aged and spice rubbed.

Choice of: Habanero Cook’s Butter, Bourbon Molasses Steak Sauce, or Chimichurri

Chicken Steak

Mojito marinated, boneless, skinless breast, smoked onions & chimichurri


Dinosaur Bar-B-Que Recipes

It is July 4th and the weather is beautiful. When you get back form being on the boats, jet skis, and wave runners, then it is time to barbecue. My favorite BBQ restaurant is Dinosaur Bar-B-Que. If you have went to, or go to Syracuse University, you know damn well what I am talking bout. If you have never been to Dinosaur BBQ, it is imperative you make it out to one of its three extremely successful locations in Syracuse, Rochester or New York City. But today is about BBQing at home with your family and friends, so The Campus Socialite is going to bring Dinosaur Bar-B-Que to you!

DINOSAUR BAR-B-QUE’S MAC N CHEESE (Courtesy of http://www.rahchachow.blogspot.com/)

(1/2 of the printed recipe, with a few modifications from me)

2 Tablespoons vegetable oil

1/3 cup green pepper, diced

1/2 teaspoon chopped garlic (1 clove)

2 ounces flour (about a scant 1/2 cup)

7 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded

2 1/2 ounces Colby cheese, shredded

5 ounces American cheese, shredded (I cubed slices of American cheese)

2 ounces Pecorino Romano, shredded

1 teaspoon French’s mustard

3/4 teaspoon Tabasco sauce

3/4 pounds elbow macaroni (you could go up to 1 pound to make it serve more/less rich)

4 ounces of shredded cheddar cheese

1 tablespoon Pecorino Romano cheese

Heat oil in a large pot. Add onions and peppers cook until onions are translucent. Add garlic and cook until fragrant. Stir in flour. Add water and half-and-half. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Using an immersion blender, puree this mixture until it is smooth (if using a regular blender, work in batches, filling the pitcher only half-full, since the liquid will be hot). Slowly add cheeses to warm pureed mixture, making sure all cheese is melted before adding more. (If the cheese isn’t melting, return the pot to low heat and stir constantly.) Once cheese is completely melted, add salt, lemon pepper, sugar, mustard, vinegar and Tabasco. Stir to combine.

Cook dried elbow macaroni in boiling water, according to manufacturer’s instructions. Cook until al dente, not completely soft.

Combine hot, cooked pasta and sauce in the large pot stir well to combine. Pour entire mixture into a greased 11-inch-by-7-inch pan (a 9 by 9 probably would work as well). Top with 8 ounces. of shredded cheddar cheese and 2 tablespoons of Pecorino Romano cheese.

Place under broiler until top is golden brown and bubbling. Serve immediately.

DINOSAUR BAR-B-QUE SPICY SHAMELESS SHRIMP RECIPE


These delectable shrimp boiled in beer and rolled in lots of spice and garlic are the most popular appetizer of Dinosaur BBQ. Their “a-peel” has always been in the roll-up-your-sleeves sloppy nature of eating ’em. There’s nothin’ polite about ’em, and that’s the way we like it

* 2 bottles or cans (12 ounces each) domestic beer

* 2 tablespoons Old Bay seasoning

* 2 pounds large shrimp in the shell

* 2 tablespoons minced garlic

* 2 tablespoons Creole Seasoning

* 1 cup prepared horseradish

* 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

* 2 teaspoons Tabasco sauce

* ***** Check the Mutha Sauce Recipe

* Just like the name says, this is the basis-the true mother of all the sauces we have in this book.( dinosaur barbque by john stage nancy radke)It is a balanced blend of sweet, savory, spicy, and smoky flavors that acts as our leapin’ off point for creating a world of barbecue sensations. It can even stand alone as a traditional slatherin’ sauce for ribs and chicken.

* 1/2 cup minced green pepper

* 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced

* Pinch each of kosher salt and black pepper

* 2 tablespoons minced garlic

* 1 can (28 ounces) tomato sauce

* 2 cups ketchup (preferably Heinz)

* 3/4 cup Worcestershire sauce

* 1/4 cup cayenne pepper sauce

* 1/4 cup spicy brown mustard

* 3/4 cup dark brown sugar, packed

* 1 tablespoon chili powder

* 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper

* 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice

* 1 tablespoon Liquid Smoke (optional)

* Pour the oil into a large saucepan and set over medium-high heat. Toss in the onions, green peppers, and jalapenos and give them a stir. Season with a pinch of sa1t and pepper and cook til soft and golden. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Dump in everything else except the Liquid Smoke.

* Bring to a boil, then lower the heat so the sauce simmers. Simmer for 10 minutes. Swirl in the Liquid Smoke and let the sauce cool.

* Pour it into a container, cover, and store in the fridge til ready to use.

* Add 2 or 3 seeded and minced habanero peppers (about 1 1/2 teaspoons to 1 tablespoon) along with the onions, peppers, and jalapenos. Also add 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper along with the other ingredients for extra punch.

* Working with habanero can cause plenty of personal pain and suffering if you’re not careful. Never touch the cut flesh or seeds with your bare hands. While it won’t sting your hands (unless you’ve got a cut), the volatile oils from the peppers get into your pores and can be transferred to your eyes or other moist, sensitive areas on your body long after you’re done cookin’. Even washing your hands doesn’t help. So wear latex gloves while working with habaneras and be sure to protect yourself.

1. Pour the beer, vinegar, and water into a high-sided pan. Add the Old Bay Seasoning, cover, and blast the heat up high. When it boils rapidly, add the shrimp.

2. Cover again and cook for 2 minutes, or til the shrimp turn pink and the flesh is just opaque.

3. Drain the shrimp in a colander and cover with a layer of ice to chill them down just enough to stop the cooking.

4. Throw the shrimp into a bowl and toss with the garlic and Creole Seasoning, (They can be eaten warm or chilled.)

5. Whip all of the ingredients for the cocktail sauce together in a bowl, and serve with that mess

DINOSAUR BARBECUE RIBS STYLE

Straight from the Dinosaur Cookbook, “This is our reason for being. If you’re a rib joint, you’d better have great ribs. What we strive for every day is a perfect balance of spice, smoke, sauce and pull-off-the-bone tender pork. Here’s the blueprint and some tips to achieve some beautiful barbecue. All you need are a few hours and a dedicated pit boss spirit.”

Mutha Sauce

Pour the oil into a large saucepan and set over medium-high heat. Add the onions, green peppers and jalapenos and stir. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper and cook until soft and golden. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Add everything else except the Liquid Smoke. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat so the sauce simmers. Simmer for 10 minutes. Swirl in the Liquid Smoke, and let the sauce cool. Pour into a container, cover and store in the fridge until ready to use. Makes 6 to 7 cups.

To prepare the ribs, coat evenly with the All-Purpose Red Rub.

To prepare the grill, remove the grill rack and fire up the grill. Then prepare smoking packets by placing 3 cups of hickory wood chips in a bowl and covering them with water. Soak for at least half an hour. Drain well and divide between 2 squares of aluminum foil. Form into 2 individual packets, and poke holes in one side. Set aside.

Spread out the coals once they’re hot, piling them on one side of the bottom of the grill. Set the wood chip packets on top of the coals. Stick a drip pan filled with 1/2 inch of water on the side opposite the coals. This will catch the drips from the ribs and keep things moist inside the grill. Reposition the grill rack over the coals and the drip pan. Cover the grill and let the fire simmer down a bit.

Position the ribs and position them on the rack over the drip pan. Cover the grill and test its internal temperature by dropping an instant-read thermoneter down through a vent hole. The grill temperature should be between 225 degrees and 250 degrees. Check on the ribs about ever 45 minutes for the next 3 1/2 to 4 hours. If the rib are looking a bit thirsty, mop lightly with the Mop Sauce. If the temperature of grill dips below 225 degrees, add a few more hot coals to the fire.

To test the ribs for doneness, gently tear the meat between the bones, poke your finger through the meat, check if the meat’s internal temperature is at least 180 degrees. Once you’ve determined the ribs are done, finish by glazing or caramelizing with the Mutha Sauce.

To glaze the ribs, brush with Mutha Sauce and let the ribs cook for 20 minutes in the covered grill.

To caramelize the ribs, crank the heat up to high on the grill and flip the finished rim over onto direct high heat. When they’re nice and bronze colored, brush with barbecue sauce and serve.

HAVE A GREAT JULY 4TH FROM ALL OF US AT THE CAMPUS SOCIALITE! PARTY HARD AND KEEP IT CLASSY!


John Stage's Dinosaur Bar-B-Que-Style Ribs

Restaurant adds Northeastern twist to classic Southern barbecue.

Platelist: Dinosaur Bar-B-Que

July 13, 2012— -- John Stage and two partners founded Dinosaur Bar-B-Que in 1983 as a mobile concession. For five years they toured motorcycle shows and other events throughout the Northeast.

In 1988 they settled down, opening a restaurant in Syracuse, N.Y. Openings followed in Rochester, N.Y., Troy, N.Y., Newark, N.J., and Harlem, in New York City.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que's restaurants and sauces/rubs have been acclaimed in Men's Health and Eating Well and on the Food Network and the Travel Channel.

"Our menu is firmly rooted in the traditions of Southern bar-b-que, but there are other influences that shape our flavors and give our food its own distinctive character," the company's website says.

Dinosaur-Style Ribs

2 racks of pork spareribs, St. Louis cut (2.5 to 3 pounds)

1/2 cup of All-Purpose Red Rub (recipe below)

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

2 tablespoons All-Purpose Red Rub

6 tablespoons granulated onion

1 tablespoon black pepper

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Make the mop sauce: Throw everything together in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Cool, pour into a plastic container, cover and refrigerate for later use. Makes 1 3/4 cups.

Make the rub: Dump all the ingredients into a bowl and rub them together with your hands. Store in a plastic or glass container until ready to use. Makes 2 3/4 cups.

Prepare the grill: Pull off the grill rack and fire up the grill then prepare the smoking packets by putting 3 cups of hickory wood chips in a bowl and covering them with water. Soak for at least half an hour. Drain well and divide between 2 squares of aluminum foil. Form into 2 individual packets, poking holes in one side. Set aside.

Spread out the coals once they're good and hot, piling them on one side of the bottom of the grill. Set the wood chip packets on top of the coals. Place a drip pan filled with half an inch of water on the side opposite the coals. This will catch the drips from the ribs and keep things moist inside the grill. Reposition the grill rack over the coals and the drip pan. Cover the grill and let the fire simmer down a bit.

Make the ribs: Rub the ribs all over with the rub, making sure you are getting it into every surface. (You can even do this step well in advance) Use just enough to coat the ribs evenly.

Grab the ribs and position them on the rack over the drip pan. Cover the grill and test its internal temperature by dropping an instant-read thermometer down the vent hold. You want the grill to be from 225 to 250 degrees (same temperature you would use in an oven.)

Walk away from the grill and let the heat and smoke do their thing. Come back to check on the ribs in about 45 minutes. Then check on things once every hour. If the ribs are looking a bit thirsty, mop lightly with the Mop Sauce. If the temperature of the grill is dipping below 225 degrees, add a few more coals to the fire.

Test the ribs: Test the ribs for doneness once they've been cooking for 3.5 to 4 hours. You'll know they are done if you can gently tear the meat between the bones, or poke your finger through the meat, or if they've reached an internal temperature of 180 degrees, or if they bend nicely when you grab them in the middle with a pair of tongs. Once you've determined that they're done, get out the sauce and apply a final coat.


CRL Recipes Series: Dinosaur Bar-B-Que’s Home-style BBQ Pulled Pork

This recipe for home-style BBQ pulled pork comes courtesy of Dinosaur Bar-B-Que in Troy.

  • 1 ½ to 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • *6 to 8 tablespoons Dinosaur Cajun Foreplay Spice Rub
  • 1 pork Boston butt shoulder (6 to 7 lbs)
  • *2 cups Dinosaur Sensuous Slathering Sauce

*Can be purchased at Price Chopper, at any Dinosaur Bar-B-Que Restaurant or at www.dinobbq.com
Serves 8

Directions
Dump 9 cups of hickory wood chips in a bowl, cover with water and let soak for a half hour or so. Drain and divide them between six squares of aluminum foil. Wrap into individual packets, poking holes in the top. Set aside.

Pull off the grill rack and fire up the grill. While that’s going on, mix together the oil and the rub. Rub all over the pork butt. Once the coals are good and hot, pile them up on one side of the bottom of the grill and set two of the wood chips packets right on the coals. Position a drip pan filled with ½ inch of water opposite the coals. Put the grill rack back in place. Set the pork butt, fat side up, over the drip pan and close the lid. After about half an hour, check the grill temperature. It should settle down to 225 to 250 . If it’s hotter, close down the vent holes. If it’s cooler, open them up a bit.

Check the temperature of the grill every hour for the next 7 to 8 hours and make adjustments. If the temperature dips down to 200 or less, add a couple of hot new briquettes to the pile of gray coals, close the lid and open the vent holes a bit.

Reach into the grill with some tongs after the pork butt’s been smoking for 1 ½ hours and remove the old packets of wood chips. Toss two new packets of foil-wrapped chips onto the coals. Repeat after another 1 ½ hours.

After the pork butt’s been on the grill for 4 to 5 hours, you have achieved the necessary smoke penetration. It should be a rich mahogany brown, and the internal temperature should be about 155 . Grab the meat with tongs, remove it from the grill and wrap tightly in foil. Put the foil-wrapped pork butt over the drip pan and cover the grill. Now you’re sealing in the succulence of the meat as you continue to cook. This will take another 3 ro 3 ½ hours, so keep working to maintain an even temperature of 224 to 250 . The pork is done when you can push down on the foil and it doesn’t spring back or when you can pull out the shoulder blade bone easily without very much resistance.

Lift the foil-wrapped pork off the grill and let it rest (still covered in foil) for 10 to 15 minutes. Open the foil and strip off the fat cap on top of the meat and then pull out the shoulder blade (if you haven’t already). Carefully pull the meat apart, removing any visible fat and connective tissue. Shred the meat by squishing it between your fingers – the dark meat will shred easily, but you might have to pull apart the whiter meat into strings.

Put the pulled pork into a baking pan and pour the Mutha Sauce over it. Use it right away or cover it with foil and re-warm in a 200 oven.

Now it’s ready to pack into rolls for sandwiches. Be sure to serve some more Mutha Sauce at the table.


Grilled scallop ceviche

From Dinosaur Bar-B-Que: An American Roadhouse Dinosaur Bar-B-Que by John Stage and Nancy Radke

Are you sure you want to delete this recipe from your Bookshelf. Doing so will remove all the Bookmarks you have created for this recipe.

  • Categories: Grills & BBQ Appetizers / starters Mexican
  • Ingredients: sea scallops jalapeño chiles red peppers limes garlic oranges ground cumin dried oregano cilantro

  • 1/2 cup paprika
  • 1/2 cup granulated garlic
  • 1/4 cup granulated onion
  • 3 tablespoons black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons white pepper
  • 2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 cup dried oregano
  • 1/4 cup dried thyme
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Store in an airtight plastic or glass container with a lid.
  2. This is a great seasoning for seafood and steak.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que's Home Style Pulled Bar-B-Que Pork

Pulled Pork is one of the wonders of true blue barbecue. It starts with a pork butt, also called a Boston butt, which is the meat surrounding the shoulder blade of the pig. This a tough, fatty piece that’s magically transformed with spices, smoke, and slow cookin’ into something lean and melt-in-your-mouth tender.

1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

6 to 8 tablespoons All-Purpose Red Rub

1 pork Boston butt shoulder (6 to 7 pounds)

Dump 9 cups of hickory wood chips in a bowl, cover with water, and let them soak for half an hour or so. Drain and divide them between 6 squares of aluminum foil. Wrap up into individual packets, poking holes in the top. Set aside.

Pull off the grill rack and fire up the grill. While that’s going on, mix together the oil and the rub. Rub this all over the pork butt. Once the coals are good and hot, pile them up on one side of the bottom of the grill and set 2 of the wood chip packets right on the coals. Position a drip pan filled with 1/2 inch of water on the side opposite the coals. Put the grill rack back in place. Set the pork butt, fat side up, over the drip pan, and close the lid. After about half an hour, check the grill temperature. It should settle down to 225 to 250. If it’s hotter, close down the vent holes. If it’s cooler, open them up a bit.

Check the temperature of the grill every hour for the next 7 to 8 hours and make adjustments. If the temperature dips down to 200 or less, add a couple of hot new briquettes to the pile of gray coals, close the lid, and open the vent holes a bit.

Reach into the grill with some tongs after the pork butt’s been smoking for 1 1/2 hours, and remove the old packets of wood chips. Toss two new packets of foil-wrapped chips onto the coals. Repeat after another 1 1/2 hours.

After the pork butt’s been on the grill for 4 to 5 hours, you have achieved the necessary smoke penetration. It should be a rich mahogany brown, and the internal temperature should be about 155. Grab the meat with tongs, remove it from the grill, and wrap it tightly in foil. Put the foil-wrapped pork butt back over the drip pan and cover the grill. Now you’re sealing in the succulence of the meat as you continue to cook. This will take another 3 to 3 1/2 hours. So keep working to maintain an even temperature of 225 to 250. The pork is done when you can push down on the foil and it doesn’t spring back or when you can pull out the shoulder blade bone easily without very much resistance.

Lift the foil-wrapped pork butt off the grill and let it rest (still covered in foil) for 10 to 15 minutes. Open the foil and strip off the fat cap on top of the meat, and then pull out the shoulder blade (if you haven’t already). Carefully pull the meat apart, removing any visible fat and connective tissue. Shred the meat by squishing it between your fingers—the dark meat will shred easily, but you might have to pull apart the whiter meat into strings.

Put the pulled pork into a baking pan and pour the Mutha Sauce over it. Use it right away, or cover it with foil and rewarm in a 200 oven. Now it’s ready to pack into rolls for sandwiches. Be sure to serve some more Mutha Sauce at the table. Feeds 8.


Watch the video: Platelist: Dinosaur Bar-B-Que