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8 Foods That Can Lower Your Cholesterol

8 Foods That Can Lower Your Cholesterol


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From oats to walnuts, a handful of everyday foods are stepping up to the plate when it comes to battling unhealthy cholesterol.

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8 Foods That Will Lower Children's Cholesterol Levels

Childhood obesity is on the rise and so are children’s cholesterol levels.

Children between the ages of 2 and 19 should have a total cholesterol level of 170 or below, according to the American Heart Association.

But poor eating and lifestyle habits are sending some children’s cholesterol levels above that threshold.

"Kids are eating way too many fast foods and processed foods,” said Tanya Zuckerbrot, a nutritionist and author of “The F-Factor Diet.”

“It’s not even the drive-thrus, it’s the refined foods, the Pop Tarts, and the white breads and the crackers and the chips that kids are snacking on. And kids are not moving as much," Zuckerbrot said.

But Zuckerbrot said all that’s needed is for kids to move a little more and to include more fiber into their diets. Fiber, according to the American Heart Association is an important dietary source for improving digestion and lowering cholesterol.

There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble. Soluble has been shown to modestly reduce cholesterol levels, while insoluble fiber has been associated with decreased cardiovascular risk and slower progression of cardiovascular disease in high-risk individuals, according to the heart association’s Web site.

Here are Zuckerbrot’s picks for high-fiber foods that will appeal to kids and help lower their cholesterol:

1. Berries. Any kind of berry is good for children, but raspberries have the most fiber, with 8 grams per cup. The skins of the fruit – like apples — also are rich sources of fiber, which will keep kids full and satisfied longer — so don't peel them.

"Mix them in pancakes, put it on top of their cereal or you can serve it for dessert on top of a little bit of whipped cream," she suggested.

2. High-Fiber Cereal. "A high-fiber cereal is one of the best ways for you kids to meet half of their fiber needs before breakfast,” Zuckerbrot said.

Many cereals contain anywhere from 4 to 14 grams of fiber in just a half a cup serving, she said.

But parents should be on the lookout for high-sugar content. She said to aim for 15 grams of sugar or less. Four grams of sugar equals one teaspoon, so if the cereal has 20 grams of sugar, a child will start off his day with five added teaspoons of sugar.

3. Beans. Beans contain 8 grams of fiber per cup, as well as body-building protein.

"Beans mix really well when you make meat dishes, so (with) meatloaf or meatballs, you can mix them in and your kids won’t even know they’re getting some high fiber beans in there," she said.

4. Pasta. Many children enjoy pasta. If your child is one of them, try using whole wheat pasta, which is higher in fiber and contains fewer refined carbohydrates than white pasta.

If your kids don’t enjoy eating whole wheat pasta because of its nutty flavor, Zuckerbrot recommended mixing white and whole wheat pasta together to get them used to the taste.

5. Soy. Use soy products whenever possible.

"They are power foods when it comes to lowering cholesterol because soy products contain something called isoflavones, which naturally reduce the bad cholesterol and reduce the risk factors for cardiovascular disease," Zuckerbrot said.

6. Popcorn. When it comes to cholesterol-lowering snacks for kids, you can’t beat popcorn, Zuckerbrot said.

One cup of kernels contains 7 grams of fiber, she said. “And compared to other snack foods, like pretzels or potato chips that contain little to no fiber, this is a snack food that kids are going to enjoy and its going to help bring down the bad cholesterol.”

Stay away from "bad popcorns," like those popped in oil or those that contain lots of sugar or salt.

7. Peanut Butter. Nuts are a high source of omega-3 fatty acids, which help in lowering cholesterol, triglycerides and prevent cardiovascular diseases.

"Peanut butter also contains some fiber. For about 2 tablespoons you get 2 grams of fiber and fiber also helps lower cholesterol,” Zuckerbrot said.

8. Dark Chocolate. Kids will probably pick milk chocolate over dark chocolate, but the dark variety is the healthiest, Zuckerbrot said.

"Dark chocolate is high in flavonoids,” she said. “And flavonoids help platelets from sticking together therefore reducing the risk factor for blood clots. In addition, studies show that it lowers the bad cholesterol by as much as 10 percent."


15 foods that lower cholesterol

A person’s diet plays a crucial role in how healthy their cholesterol levels are. Eating foods that keep cholesterol within a healthy range can help prevent health issues, including a heart attack or stroke.

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that travels through the bloodstream as a part of two different lipoproteins: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL).

People sometimes refer to LDL cholesterol as “bad” cholesterol because it causes fatty deposits to build up in the blood vessels. These deposits can block blood flow and cause heart attacks or strokes.

HDL, or “good,” cholesterol helps remove cholesterol from the body through the liver. High levels of HDL cholesterol can reduce the risk of heart problems and strokes.

This article lists foods that a person can incorporate into their diet to improve their cholesterol levels. It also looks into which foods to avoid.

Eggplant is high in dietary fiber: A 100-g portion contains 3 grams (g) of fiber. As the American Heart Association (AHA) point out, fiber helps improve blood cholesterol levels. It also reduces the risk of developing:

Okra, or lady’s fingers, is a warm-season vegetable that people cultivate throughout the world.

Researchers have found that a gel in okra called mucilage can help lower cholesterol by binding to it during digestion. This helps cholesterol leave the body through stool.

A small 2019 study found that among 40 participants with mildly high cholesterol, eating two apples a day reduced both total and LDL cholesterol levels. It also lowered levels of triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood.

One apple can contain 3–7 g of dietary fiber, depending on its size. In addition, apples contain compounds called polyphenols, which may also have a positive impact on cholesterol levels.

Avocados are rich in heart-healthy nutrients. A 2015 study concluded that eating one avocado a day as part of a moderate fat, cholesterol-lowering diet can improve cardiovascular disease risk, specifically by lowering LDL cholesterol without lowering HDL cholesterol.

One cup, or 150 g, of avocado contains 14.7 g of monounsaturated fats, which can reduce LDL cholesterol levels and lower the risk of heart disease and strokes.

Omega-3 fats, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are essential polyunsaturated fats found in fish such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, with well-documented anti-inflammatory and heart health benefits.

EPA can help protect the blood vessels and heart from disease by lowering levels of triglycerides, a fat that enters the bloodstream after a meal. This is one of many ways that it may prevent atherosclerosis and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Other heart health benefits include preventing cholesterol crystals from forming in the arteries, reducing inflammation, and improving the way that HDL cholesterol works.

Oats significantly improved blood cholesterol levels over a period of 4 weeks in a small 2017 study. Participants with mildly elevated cholesterol levels ate 70 g of oats per day in the form of porridge. This provided them with 3 g of soluble fiber per day, the amount that is needed to lower cholesterol, according to research.

The team found that the participants’ LDL cholesterol levels fell by 11.6% in 28 days.

Other research confirms that the soluble fiber in oats lowers LDL cholesterol levels and can improve cardiovascular risk as part of a heart-healthy diet.

A person can add oats to their diet by eating porridge or oat-based cereal for breakfast.

Barley is a healthy grain that is rich in vitamins and minerals and high in fiber.

A 2018 study concluded that beta-glucan, a type of soluble dietary fiber found in barley, as well as oats, can help lower LDL cholesterol.

A 2020 study shed more light on how this happens. The team found that beta-glucan reduces LDL cholesterol by trapping bile acids and limiting how much cholesterol the body absorbs during digestion.

The body uses cholesterol to produce bile acids, replacing those that are trapped, which leads to an overall reduction in cholesterol levels.

The beta-glucan in barley also has a positive effect on the gut microbiome and blood glucose control, further benefiting heart health.

Nuts are a good source of unsaturated fats, which can help lower LDL cholesterol levels, especially when they replace saturated fats in the diet.

Nuts are also rich in fiber, which helps keep the body from absorbing cholesterol and promotes its excretion.

All nuts are suitable for a heart-healthy, cholesterol-lowering diet, including:

Soybeans and soy products, such as tofu, soy milk, and soy yogurt, are suitable for a cholesterol-lowering diet.

A 2019 analysis of 46 investigations into the effects of soy on LDL cholesterol found that a median intake of 25 g of soy protein per day over 6 weeks lowered LDL cholesterol by a clinically significant 4.76 milligrams per deciliter.

Overall, the researchers concluded that soy protein can reduce LDL cholesterol by around 3–4% in adults, cementing its place in a heart-healthy, cholesterol-lowering diet.

Cocoa, which can be found in dark chocolate, contains flavonoids, a group of compounds in many fruits and vegetables. Their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties can benefit health in various ways.

In a 2015 study , participants drank a beverage containing cocoa flavanol twice a day for a month. By the end of the trial, their LDL cholesterol levels and blood pressure had decreased, and their HDL cholesterol levels had increased.

However, eat dark chocolate products in moderation, as they can be high in saturated fats and sugar.

Lentils are rich in fiber, containing 3.3 g per 100-g portion. Fiber can prevent the body from absorbing cholesterol into the bloodstream.

A small 2015 study that included 39 participants who had type 2 diabetes and were overweight or had obesity demonstrated the positive effects of eating lentils on cholesterol levels. After 8 weeks of eating 60 g of lentil sprouts per day, HDL levels improved, and LDL and triglyceride levels decreased.

People can use garlic in a wide range of dishes, and it has many health benefits.

For example, researchers have found that garlic can help regulate serum cholesterol levels. And another study determined that garlic can also help reduce blood pressure.

However, these studies involved garlic supplements — it would be difficult to include enough garlic in the diet to have a noticeable effect on cholesterol levels.

Antioxidants called catechins in certain teas, such as green tea, can be very beneficial to health.

A 2020 study found that green tea consumption significantly improved cholesterol levels, reducing both total and LDL cholesterol levels without lowering HDL cholesterol levels. The researchers call for further studies to confirm their findings.

Extra virgin olive oil features regularly in the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet. One of its many uses is as a cooking oil.

Substituting saturated fat, found in butter, with monounsaturated fat, found in extra virgin olive oil, might help reduce LDL levels.

Moreover, extra virgin olive oil has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can be very beneficial to cardiovascular and overall health.

Kale is an excellent source of fiber and many other nutrients. One cup of boiled kale contains 4.7 g of fiber.

A 2016 review demonstrated the link between fiber intake and a reduction in blood fat levels and blood pressure. Including more fiber in the diet can help lower levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol.

Kale is also very rich in antioxidants, which are good for the heart and help reduce inflammation.

Below are some ideas for meals that may help improve cholesterol levels:

Breakfast

  • apple and peanut butter on whole grain toast
  • cinnamon oats and low fat plain Greek yogurt
  • oatmeal with blueberries and almonds

Lunch

  • vegetables and hummus in whole grain pita
  • Mediterranean vegetable stew with barley
  • kale salad topped with edamame and avocado

Dinner

  • poached salmon with asparagus and brown rice
  • lentil stew with salsa verde
  • whole wheat pasta with chicken and brussels sprouts tossed in olive oil

Snacks

Try the following snacks in moderation as part of a cholesterol-lowering diet:

  • fresh or frozen fruits
  • raw vegetables dipped in hummus or guacamole
  • whole grain pretzels or crackers
  • roasted chickpeas or edamame
  • rye crisps with tuna
  • low fat or fat free yogurt
  • a handful of pistachios or another nut
  • apple slices with almond butter
  • a granola bar made from oats, nuts, and dried fruit

The AHA recommend reducing the amount of saturated and trans fats in the diet to lower cholesterol and heart disease risk.

To reduce levels of “bad” cholesterol, limit the intake of the following foods, which contain high levels of saturated and trans fats:

  • fatty meat, such as lamb and pork
  • lard and shortening
  • butter and cream
  • palm oil
  • cakes and donuts
  • pastries
  • potato chips
  • fried foods
  • full fat dairy products

Keeping LDL cholesterol levels low is important, as it decreases the risk of heart disease and stroke.

A person can do this by maintaining a healthy diet that includes high-fiber fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, fatty fish, unprocessed soy, and the occasional dark chocolate treat.

It is also important to limit the intake of foods high in saturated fat, as these can increase LDL cholesterol levels and the risk of heart disease, stroke, and obesity.


Dinner Recipes That Are Low In Cholesterol : Lower Cholesterol Recipes

Dinner Recipes That Are Low In Cholesterol

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Beef may not be the obvious choice when it comes to healthy recipes to lower cholesterol, but flank steak—the cut of beef used here—is low in saturated fat.

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From moms' banana custard pudding to savory seafood custard.

Some deliver soluble fiber, which binds cholesterol and its precursors in the digestive system and drags them out of the body before they get into circulation.

Get tips to avoid health problems.

This helpful shopping list includes 11 foods that are low in cholesterol:

Recipes that are low in cholesterol, but still have flavor.

2 low cholesterol recipes also help you eliminate sugar and refined carbohydrates.

Quick and healthy menus in 45 minutes (or less).

Foods that are surprisingly bad for.

Different foods lower cholesterol in various ways.

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that travels through the bloodstream as a part of two different lipoproteins:

Pounding the chicken thin helps it cook quickly alongside the carrots and.

Foods that are surprisingly bad for.

Experts explain how to lower cholesterol naturally, and they stress that diet is key.

Some deliver soluble fiber, which binds cholesterol and its precursors in the digestive system and drags them out of the body before they get into circulation.

(1) there are numerous healthy low cholesterol recipes you can utilize for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

(1) there are numerous healthy low cholesterol recipes you can utilize for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Recipes that are low in cholesterol, but still have flavor.

Well, have a look at a typical recipe in a day of foods that lower cholesterol.

There are many websites that you can visit that will give you a multitude of low cholesterol recipes.

Beef may not be the obvious choice when it comes to healthy recipes to lower cholesterol, but flank steak—the cut of beef used here—is low in saturated fat.

Honestly delicious recipes that can help you lower cholesterol.

Below you will find what natural low cholesterol foods you can eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks.

Quick and healthy menus in 45 minutes (or less).

Recipes that help you lower and maintain a good level of cholesterol are important to your overall health.


Coriander seeds or dhaniya seeds have been used in Ayurvedic medicine since ancient times [9]. According to studies, coriander seeds can help lower bad cholesterol and triglyceride levels significantly. Boil 2 tablespoons of coriander seeds in a glass of water, strain the decoction after cooling and drink it twice a day.

Psyllium husk is a rich source of soluble fibre which helps lower LDL cholesterol significantly. According to a study, people with LDL cholesterol concentrations between 3.36 and 4.91 mmol/L were given 5.1 g psyllium husk for 26 weeks. The result showed lower LDL cholesterol concentrations [10]. The amount needed to lower cholesterol is 10 to 20 grams of psyllium husk a day.

Note: Psyllium is generally taken three times a day, just before each meal, either in a capsule or as a powder that you mix with water or juice.


8 Whole Grain Foods That Lower Cholesterol

S ubstituting refined flour with whole grains in your diet brings a variety of health benefits, including lower cholesterol, reduced diabetes risk and better weight control. Do you think whole grains are just about sandwich bread? Find out what you’ve been missing.

If amaranth and quinoa sound like the latest celebrity baby names, chances are you don’t know enough about some important foods that can help you be healthier: whole grains. Eating a diet rich in high-fiber whole grain foods can lower the risk of several chronic conditions, such as high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes, according to various studies, including a 2007 research analysis of 285,000 people, published in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases. “Fiber has a glowing list of health benefits, [and] most Americans’ diets are woefully deficient in this life-giving form of carbohydrate,” says Ann Kulze, M.D., a nutrition expert and author of Dr. Ann’s 10 Step Diet (Top Ten Wellness and Fitness). “Whether your goals are boosting heart health, improved weight control or lowering your risk of type 2 diabetes and colon cancer, fiber is an all-star, disease-fighting champion,” she says. Why are whole grains so healthful? They have all three parts of the grain in its natural state: the bran, a tough outer shell that contains most of the fiber the germ, a concentrated source of nutrients and the endosperm, which provides most of the grain’s bulk. Processed or “refined” grains, such as white flour or white rice, have had the bran and germ stripped away, leaving just the starchy endosperm. But whole grains retain all those nutrients and fiber.

The USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that whole grains make up at least half of adults' grain consumption, up to three servings, or “ounce equivalents,” each day. (Think of an ounce equivalent as a slice of bread, one cup of ready-to-eat cereal flakes or a half-cup of cooked whole grains such as brown rice, bulgur or steel-cut oats.) It's easy to boost your whole grain consumption. You can swap white rice for brown rice, wild rice or bulgur (the wheat grain found in tabbouleh salad) add wild rice or barley to soups, stews, casseroles and salads mix whole grains into ground meats and use oats and bran instead of breadcrumbs in recipes. Most whole grains are simmered in liquid (water, broth or even milk) until tender. The larger and denser the grain, the longer it takes to cook. Even if convenience is a factor, you can still get whole grain health benefits. For example, when participants ate two servings of ready-to-eat oatmeal daily as part of a weight-loss program, they lowered their total and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels, and slimmed down their waistlines, more so than those who ate lower-fiber foods, according to a 2010 study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. The Whole Grains Council, a nonprofit advocacy group, suggests cooking large batches of whole grains such as quinoa, steel-cut oats, barley or brown rice and storing the leftovers in the refrigerator, where they’ll keep for 3-4 days. Then you can quickly warm them up and toss them into salads, vegetables or soups. Here are eight whole grain foods that will add nutrition, flavor and texture to your diet while helping to keep you healthy.

Whole grain foods #1: Amaranth
This ancient grain is high in B vitamins and minerals, says Patti Milligan, R.D., a Phoenix-area registered dietitian. It’s also a good source of essential amino acids – especially lysine, which helps the body absorb calcium and supports bone and connective tissue health, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center, in Baltimore. A 1-cup serving of cooked amaranth has about 9 grams of protein. To cook: Use 2 cups liquid per 1 cup dry amaranth. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 20-25 minutes. Each cup of cooked amaranth contains 251 calories, 4 grams of fat, 9 grams of protein, 5 grams of dietary fiber, 46 grams of carbohydrates, 15 mg of sodium and 0mg cholesterol. Whole grain foods #2: Brown rice
Brown rice, which is unrefined (with the hull and germ intact), is low in fat and a good source of dietary fiber and protein. Unlike white rice, it has a chewy, hearty texture. “What’s really cool about it is the mineral and iron content,” Milligan says. “Women who still have a monthly cycle need to get other sources of iron aside from meats,” she adds. “Brown rice is a nice source of good, absorbable iron, and it has the B12 and C vitamins that help iron get absorbed.”

Replacing white rice with brown rice and other whole grains can cut the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to an analysis of findings from the large-scale Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses’ Health Study I and II, begun in 1976 and still continuing. Participants who ate two or more servings of brown rice each week had an 11% lower risk of diabetes than those who ate brown rice only once a month. To cook: Use 2-1/2 cups liquid per cup of rice. Bring to a boil, and then simmer for 25-45 minutes. Each cup of cooked, long-grain brown rice contains 216 calories, 2 grams of fat, 5 grams of protein, 4 grams of dietary fiber, 45 grams of carbohydrates, 10 mg of sodium and no cholesterol. When temperature and moisture conditions are just right, brown rice grains sprout. Enzyme activity during sprouting makes the starchy endosperm more digestible to the growing plant - and to you. Sprouting also increases key nutrients in the grain, including vitamins B and C, folate and fiber. Because sprouted grains are higher in protein and fiber than other grain products, and lower on the glycemic index (meaning they burn more slowly and don’t spike blood sugar levels), they’re beneficial for people with diabetes and others watching their glycemic intake, according to a 2008 study published in the Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology. Sprouted brown rice cooks in 25 minutes, about half the time required for regular brown rice.

Whole grain foods #3: Bulgur
A Middle Eastern wheat product made from boiled, dried and cracked wheat kernels, bulgur is high in fiber and contains key vitamins and minerals, including niacin, thiamine, folate, iron, manganese and magnesium. Like pasta, it takes about 10 minutes to prepare. Its mild flavor and quick cooking time make it a good choice for whole grain novices. To cook: Use 2 cups liquid per cup of bulgur. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 10-12 minutes or until al dente. Drain excess liquid. Alternatively, you can add boiling liquid to the bulgur, cover, and let stand for 20-30 minutes. Each cup of cooked bulgur contains 151 calories, 6 grams of protein, 8.2 grams of dietary fiber, 34 grams of carbohydrates, 9 mg of sodium and no fat or cholesterol. Whole grain foods #4: Rye
Rye is actually grass raised as a grain, Milligan says. It has a distinctive flavor and supplies fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals. Rye contains phytonutrients that help ease the symptoms of PMS, she says, especially mood swings, cravings and bloating.

Because rye products can be low on the glycemic index, they’re especially healthful for diabetics. But keep in mind that commercial rye bread often contains more refined wheat flour than rye flour. Rye berries can be cooked like a grain. They’re high in protein, but have more than twice the calories of whole grains such as brown rice or oatmeal. To cook: Soak rye berries overnight, then cook (use 4 cups liquid per cup of rye berries) for 45-60 minutes. Each cup of cooked rye contains 566 calories, 4.2 grams of fat, 9 grams of protein, 25 grams of dietary fiber, 118 grams of carbohydrates, 10 mg of sodium and 450 mg of potassium. Whole grain foods #5: Quinoa
Native to the Andes, quinoa (pronounced keenwah) is a little smaller than barley grains but packs a lot of protein. Cooked quinoa has 8 grams of protein per cup – 50%-100% more than most other whole grains. Milligan suggests eating it in the morning as a cereal, adding sun-dried tomatoes and basil for a salad at lunch, or adding it to smoothies at snack time. To cook: Quinoa cooks like rice. Use 2 cups liquid per cup of quinoa. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 15 minutes. To play up quinoa’s nutty flavor, toast it in a little oil before adding the liquid to the pan. Each cup of cooked quinoa contains 222 calories, 4 grams of fat, 8 grams of protein, 5 grams of dietary fiber, 39 grams of carbohydrates, 13 mg of sodium and no cholesterol.

Whole grain foods #6: Steel-cut oats
Oats are high in beta glucans – phytonutrients that help keep the immune system resilient and reduce LDL cholesterol, according to the American Heart Association. The steel-cut variety takes longer to cook, but it has a hearty, complex and chewy flavor that enthusiasts swear by. “Once you have steel-cut oats, I don’t think you’d go back to regular oats,” Milligan says. Besides eating steel-cut oats for breakfast, use them as a natural breading (combine uncooked oats with seasonings and spin them in a food processor) for fish or chicken, Milligan suggests. Steel-cut oats also make a nice risotto, she says. To cook: Use 4 cups liquid to 1 cup steel-cut oats. Bring to boil, and then simmer for 30 minutes. Each cup of cooked steel-cut oats contains 150 calories, 2.5 grams of fat, 4 grams of protein, 3 grams of dietary fiber, 27 grams of carbohydrates and no sodium or cholesterol.

Whole grain foods #7: Wheat berries
These are the entire wheat kernel, except for the outer hull. They’re also known as cracked wheat. Wheat berries are rich in fiber and have a high amino acid content, Milligan says. They have a nutty flavor, crunchy texture and can be added to salads or made into bread. They can also be eaten as a side dish or breakfast cereal. To cook: Soak overnight, and then cook (using 4 cups liquid per cup of wheat berries) for an hour or until tender. Each cup of cooked wheat berries contains 180 calories, 1 gram of fat, 6 grams of protein, 6 grams of dietary fiber, 38 grams of carbohydrates, and no sodium or cholesterol. Whole grain foods #8: Wild rice
This is actually the seed of an aquatic grass, grown mostly in the Great Lakes region, and is often mixed with rice varieties. It has more protein than brown rice. To cook: Use 3 cups liquid per 1 cup wild rice bring to a boil, then simmer for 45-55 minutes. Each cup of cooked wild rice contains 165 calories, 1 gram of fat, 7 grams of protein, 3 grams of dietary fiber, 35 grams of carbohydrates, 5 mg of sodium and no cholesterol. For more information, visit Lifescript's Cholesterol Health Center.

How Well Do You Understand Cholesterol?
Cholesterol is much maligned, yet many people don’t understand this essential substance and how it works in our bodies. Do you know your HDL from your LDL? How about which lifestyle choices influence cholesterol levels? Take this cholesterol quiz and find out.


21 Soup Recipes That Can Help To Lower Your Cholesterol

Soups are great for the cold winter months and they can also help to balance out all the overindulging around Christmas.

Shop-bought soups can be a quick and simple cholesterol-friendly lunch option if you don’t have time to make it from scratch. Make sure you pick soups that are low in saturated fat (i.e. contain less than 1.5g per 100g) and have at least one cholesterol-lowering ingredient, such as beans, lentils or barley.

Here are some good cholesterol-lowering shop-bought soups:-

  • Covent Garden Lentil And Smoked Bacon Soup
  • M&S Chicken & Super Grain Soup
  • M&S Spicy Lentil Soup (v)
  • Morrisons Tomato, Red Pepper & Lentil Soup (v)
  • Morrisons Winter Vegetable Soup (v)
  • Tesco Three Bean Chilli Soup (v)
  • Yorkshire Provender Chicken & Lentil Soup

If you can’t find one that you like with cholesterol-lowering ingredients, just buy any low fat soup and add your own cooked tinned beans before heating it up.

You can make cholesterol-friendly ‘croutons’ for your soup by breaking up oatcakes and adding them just before serving. Or simply eat your soup with a wholemeal, seeded or rye bread roll. For cholesterol-friendly margarine options, see this post .

If you have a bit more time, there are lots of recipes online for soups that that can help to lower cholesterol. Here are some my favourites:-


Dietary directives

Avoiding foods that are high in cholesterol isn't the best way to lower your LDL. Your overall diet — especially the types of fats and carbohydrates you eat — has the most impact on your blood cholesterol values. "As the American Heart Association has noted, you'll get the biggest bang for your buck by lowering saturated fat and replacing it with unsaturated fat," says registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

That means avoiding meat, cheese, and other high-fat dairy products such as butter, half-and-half, and ice cream. Equally important is replacing those calories with healthy, unsaturated fats (such as those found in vegetable oils, avocados, and fatty fish) rather than refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta, and white rice. Unlike healthy fats, these starchy foods aren't very filling, and they can trigger overeating and weight gain.

The other big problem with refined carbs? They're woefully low in fiber, which helps flush cholesterol out of the body (see "The fiber factor").

The fiber factor

Your body can't break down fiber, so it passes through your body undigested. It comes in two varieties: insoluble and soluble. Fiber-containing foods usually feature a mix of the two.

Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water. While it doesn't directly lower LDL, this form of fiber fills you up, crowding other cholesterol-raising foods out of your diet and helping to promote weight loss.

Soluble fiber dissolves in water, creating a gel. This gel traps some of the cholesterol in your body, so it's eliminated as waste instead of entering your arteries.

Soluble fiber also binds to bile acids, which carry fats from your small intestine into the large intestine for excretion. This triggers your liver to create more bile acids — a process that requires cholesterol. If the liver doesn't have enough cholesterol, it draws more from the bloodstream, which in turn lowers your circulating LDL.

Finally, certain soluble fibers (called oligosaccharides) are fermented into short-chain fatty acids in the gut. These fatty acids may also inhibit cholesterol production.


8 Foods That Can Lower Your Cholesterol - Recipes

By Claire Georgiou, Reboot Naturopath, B.HSc ND

We all know that our diet can cause high serum cholesterol and triglycerides but did you know you can lower your bad (LDL) cholesterol and improve your good (HDL) cholesterol with simple dietary changes?

Cholesterol is essential for life and health. Cholesterol is an important ingredient for the formation of cell membranes, hormones, bile acids and Vitamin D. Cholesterol is predominantly made within the liver, intestines, adrenals, ovaries and testes and a portion is also derived from the diet but too much bad cholesterol combined with inflammation can increased our risk of heart disease.

Why is “good” cholesterol good and “bad” cholesterol bad?

There are 2 main types of cholesterol.

1. LDL (low-density cholesterol) which is often called “bad” promotes fat in the blood stream

2. HDL (high-density cholesterol) often called “good” helps remove excess LDL cholesterol and triglycerides from the bloodstream thus protecting our heart health

The higher the LDL to HDL ratio, the higher the risk for the development of atherosclerosis (the hardening and clogging of the arteries which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease).

Changing your diet to reduce your cholesterol levels is the best plan of action. One of the best ways to jumpstart a diet change is by participating in a Guided Reboot. Learn more about this life-changing weight-loss program. Medications can have long-term side effects while making long-term healthy lifestyle and dietary changes will reduce your cholesterol, but will also improve your overall health.

8 Tips to Naturally Reduce Your Cholesterol:

1. Eat and Drink More Colors

Fruits, vegetables and herbs help lower LDL cholesterol. A few particularly helpful ones are garlic, onions, apples, pears, avocados, berries, cabbage family vegetables, dark leafy greens and eggplant. Fruits and vegetables contain high levels of antioxidants that protect the circulating cholesterol from oxidizing which is when it becomes particularly harmful. Fruits and vegetables also contain soluble fiber and phytosterols.

2. Include Phytosterol-rich Foods

Foods rich in phytosterol bind with cholesterol within the intestines and reduce the absorption of LDL cholesterol. Phytosterols are similar to cholesterol in structure and have a cardiovascular protective effect. Include phytosterol-rich foods such as almonds, pistachios, walnuts, macadamias, sunflower seeds, pumpkin, sesame seeds, flaxseeds, avocados, and cold-pressed oils such as flax, sesame, pumpkin, sunflower and olive oil.

3. Increase Fiber Intake

Soluble fiber is particularly helpful for reducing cholesterol absorption in the intestines. Good sources of soluble fiber are oats, barley, legumes, psyllium husks, chia seeds, flaxseeds, peas, squash, carrots, cabbage family vegetables and pectin containing fruits such as apple, strawberries, grapes and citrus fruits. Soluble fiber is still present in fresh juices!

4. Increase Essential Fatty Acids

HDL cholesterol increases when we consume more essential fatty acid foods such as oily fish, walnuts, flaxseeds and chia seeds. Here is more information on the good fats vs. bad fats.

5. Reduce Saturated Fats

Too much saturated fat can increase your cholesterol levels. Eating too much sugar and refined carbohydrates can also attribute to this as these are converted into saturated fat. Avoid full-fat dairy, fatty meats, sugar-laden foods and refined white carbohydrates in excess.

6. Avoid Trans-fats

Trans-fats may increase bad cholesterol, lower good cholesterol, increase clotting factors and promote inflammation, giving it the greatest detrimental effect on your cardiovascular health. These are found in processed foods like margarine, greasy fast foods, processed vegetable oils and any baked goods containing hydrogenated vegetable oil, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil or vegetable fat such as pastries, cakes and biscuits.

7. Maintain A Healthy Weight

Excess weight boosts harmful LDL and inactivity depresses protective HDL. Lose weight if needed and exercise more! Need help losing weight? Check out our popular Guided Reboot Programs where a nutritionist will guide you on a weight loss program.

8. Decrease Stress Levels

When our bodies are under stress, we tend to manufacture more cholesterol. Learn how these anti-inflammatory foods can help you stay stress-free.

Hear from a real success story who was able to drastically lower her cholesterol during a Reboot: