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Sopa de Arroz

Sopa de Arroz



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A family recipe for Mexican rice

© Paul Brighton - Dreamstime.com

What is Mexican food without rice and beans? Sopa de arroz, or rice soup, makes for a worthy addition to any Mexican plate. Pile it alongside a hefty helping of frijoles and buen provecho.

Notes

Swap rice with fideo (vermicelli pasta) for a more soup-like sopa de fideo.

Ingredients

  • 2 Cups long grain rice
  • 1 large tomato
  • 1/4 diced onion
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic
  • 1/4 Teaspoon black pepper
  • 4 Tablespoons oil
  • 1 Dash of cumin
  • 1 chicken boullion cube
  • 3 1/2 Cups water

Servings5

Calories Per Serving381

Folate equivalent (total)12µg3%


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Arroz Mexican Rice Recipe

Sopa de Arroz, or Mexican Rice is a staple in Mexican Cuisine. It is prepared a hundred differt ways but basically it remains the same. Only if the rice is browned in lard can you acheive the authentic flavor.

  • mexican
  • rice
  • toasted
  • broil
  • mexican

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain rice
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato Sauce
  • 2-3/4 cups water

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lard * See Note shopping list
  • 1-1/2 cups white long grain riceshopping list
  • 1 minced garlic cloveshopping list
  • 1/2 cup minced onionshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons minced Jalapénos chiles en escabèche shopping list
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoesshopping list
  • 1/4 cup uncooked green peasshopping list
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantroshopping list
  • 1 teaspoon saltshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black peppershopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine ground cuminshopping list
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano leaves shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons tomato sauceshopping list
  • 2-3/4 cups watershopping list

How to make it

  • Technically, this dish is a pilaf or pilau, because the rice is first sautéed in fat and then cooked with aromatic vegetables and seasonings in a liquid.
  • Select a covered wide pan or skillet large enough to cook the rice. Sauté, with constant stirring, the rice in hot fat until rice is a golden brown DO NOT burn any of the rice.
  • Add the onions, garlic, chile, tomatoes, peas** and cilantro then sauté for a minute or two longer.
  • Stir in salt, pepper, seasonings, tomato sauce and add water. Bring rice to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer and cover for 15 minutes. Turn off heat but leave rice covered for 5 minutes longer.
  • Fluff the rice before serving.
  • Note: Bacon drippings may be substituted for lard. Any other fats will not give the authentic flavor of this rice dish.
  • ** The peas are optional some use whole kernel corn others leave them out.
People Who Like This Dish 21
  • mommyluvs2cookSanta Fe, TX
  • trevBogangar, AU
  • squirrel_nutAustin, TX
  • ChelsLikesCookinNowhere, Us
  • shibattouFort Mohave, AZ.
  • kuklaBarrie, Ontario, CA
  • zena824Somewhere, USA, AR
  • berryWinter Park, FL
  • windy1950Flint, MI
  • lizzconnNaas Co Kildare, IE
  • Plus 11 othersFrom around the world!

Regardless of what dish it's being used in or not, I always like to saute the rice prior to adding liquid because of the aroma it gives off and the added layer of flavor imparted by the effort. Which reminds me, Old Gringo, I've been reading up on rice and saffron and all that, and I am intrigued. I even came across an article about Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and their nasty little scandal back in the early 90s about price fixing, which a movie was borne out of (The Informant) -)

Anyway, back to the rice. I've only used the plain variety extra long grain rice and wild rice (which is actually a grass), and now I am tempted to branch out to basmati and arborio and even black or purple rice. I was born in rice country in NE Arkansas, and I grew up with it. We used to eat it like a hot breakfast cereal with butter, sugar and milk. And Ma's Rice Pudding is so damn good. My Dad likes it served as a side with gravy when we have pork chops, cooked greens and cornbread.

I'm going shopping today, and I plan to see what other varieties are carried by my grocer. It's a beautiful day here, and my camera is going with me.

I love rice just about any way you fix it, and this looks to be one that will quickly become a staple in my database. ^5 to you.

I saw Daisy Martinez of "Daisy Cooks" making Arroz Amarillo Con Maiz ("Yellow Rice With Corn") a couple of weeks ago, and at first I thought she was going to add saffron to make the rice yellow. However, it turned out to be achiote oil (annato seed) that she used. Also, she added chopped salad olives (with pimiento).

Love your suggested addition of shrimp, shrimp stock and bacon bits in the Alterations section.

The Cook

The Rating

I love this recipe. we have a Mexican friend who cooks one similar and is always delicious! great post!

Linda has a recipe called gringo rice. do you think this is something close to it. Im talking about linebb. I think you know her.
This sounds delicious.

Yes, I have to agree with you on the lard same with quite a few Scottish recipes (as well as other older, authentic cuisines of many other countries. ) It seems that the more 'health conscious' we get, the more we lose touch with what foods SHOULD . more


Watch the video: SOPA DE ARROZ - Cómo hacer sopa de arroz? RECETA - Cocine con Tuti